• April 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    --1   2   3   4   5   52
    6   7   8   9   1011121
    131415161718192
    202122232425263
    27282930---4
    • 6th - Start of 2019-2020 tax year
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 22nd - Easter Monday (E,W,NI)
    • 19th - Good Friday (E, W, NI, S)
  • May 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    ----1   2   3   4
    4   5   6   7   8   9   105
    111213141516176
    181920212223247
    252627282930318
    • 6th - May Bank Holiday (E,W,NI,S)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 27th - Spring Bank Holiday (E,W,NI,S)
    • 31st - Employee P60s due
  • June 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   9
    8   9   101112131410
    1516171819202111
    2223242526272812
    2930-----13
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
  • July 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    --1   2   3   4   5   13
    6   7   8   9   10111214
    1314151617181915
    2021222324252616
    2728293031--17
    • 6th - Forms P11D, P11D(b) and P9D due
    • 6th - Form 42 Due
    • 12th - Battle of the Boyne - Bank Holiday (NI)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 19th - Payment of 2018/19 Class 1A NIC due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 31st - Payment of 2018/19 Class 2 NIC due
  • August 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    -----1   2   17
    3   4   5   6   7   8   9   18
    1011121314151619
    1718192021222320
    2425262728293021
    31------22
    • 5th - Summer Bank Holiday (S)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 26th - Summer Bank Holiday (E,W,NI)
  • September 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    -1   2   3   4   5   6   22
    7   8   9   1011121323
    1415161718192024
    2122232425262725
    282930----26
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
  • October 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    ---1   2   3   4   26
    5   6   7   8   9   101127
    1213141516171828
    1920212223242529
    262728293031-30
    • 5th - Personal Income Tax Statement
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 31st - Paper Self Assessment Tax Return Deadline
  • November 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    ------1   30
    2   3   4   5   6   7   8   31
    9   10111213141532
    1617181920212233
    2324252627282934
    30------35
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 30th - St. Andrew's Day (S)
  • December 2019

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    -1   2   3   4   5   6   35
    7   8   9   1011121336
    1415161718192037
    2122232425262738
    28293031---39
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 25th - Christmas Day
    • 26th - Boxing Day
  • January 2020

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    ----1   2   3   39
    4   5   6   7   8   9   1040
    1112131415161741
    1819202122232442
    2526272829303143
    • 1st - New Year's Day
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 31st - Online Self Assessment Tax Return Due
  • February 2020

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   44
    8   9   101112131445
    1516171819202146
    2223242526272847
    29------48
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
  • March 2020

    SatSunMonTueWedThuFriTax week
    -1   2   3   4   5   6   48
    7   8   9   1011121349
    1415161718192050
    2122232425262751
    28293031---52
    • 17th - St. Patrick's Day (NI)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
UK Tax Week

   13 Jul - 19 Jul

51

 

BAFTA TV Question Time - supported by Sargent-Disc

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Summary

A summary of the highlights from the BAFTA TV Question Time, held at BAFTA on Monday 27th October.

BAFTA TV Question Time

Sargent-Disc was delighted to support the BAFTA TV Question Time which was held at BAFTA on Monday 27th October.

The well attended event was chaired by broadcaster Steve Hewlett (The Media Show, BBC Radio 4) who led an experienced panel in a dynamic and engaging discussion which covered some of the industry's key issues.

 

The panel featured Rachel Cooke - New Statesman TV Critic, Broadcaster June Sarpong MBE, Steve Anderson - UK Managing Director at Peacock Productions, Ben Stephenson - Head of BBC Drama Commissioning and John Whittingdale - Conservative MP.

 

 BAFTA TV Question Time 2

 

The panel were united in their response to the first question, "Do you think the US network acquisition of so many UK Indies is a good thing?". They said that the UK should be confident in the strength of its creativity and view the US investment as a positive for the industry. When challenged whether we should be concerned by these changes, Ben Stephenson, emphasised how good UK content travels, while John Whittingdale questioned what the alternative might be, would be want to say no to the investment these companies bring to our economy?

 

Another highlight of the evening was a debate sparked by the question "How should the BBC be funded beyond 2016?". John Whittingdale expressed his concerns with the current structure, claiming the licence fee doesn't express current viewer habits and lacks a means-tested element. His view was not, however, shared by the other panellists or the audience. Ben Stephenson pointed out that the licence fee actually enables the BBC to make content for everyone, unlike other broadcasters.

 

Perhaps the biggest discussion of the evening was centered around the question, "Is the BBC being clever or daft by moving BBC3 online?". June Sarpong, described the move as "completely wrong" and was quick to highlight that the move goes against the evidence that their audience only consumes content online, actually 75% is being watched on TV. June raised concerns that the BBC may be losing a young and diverse audience by moving their content and asked where the training ground will be for new talent? Ben Stephenson was able to highlight some potential benefits of the move including more flexible and creative commissioning opportunities for BBC3, as well as encouraging more diverse and broad content for BBC1.

 

The discussion rounded off by addressing the question, "Why are there so many programmes around immigration and benefits claimants?" which prompted a strong response from Rachel Cooke who felt the recent examples such as Benefits Street were not a truthful or tasteful representation of these serious issues. Although the panel agreed that broadcasters need to be sensitive in how such issues are portrayed, John Whittingdale and Steve Anderson raised the interesting point that a show such as Benefits Street had no political agenda and that Channel 4 managed to take a serious issue to a new audience.

 

The event was attended by many industry professionals and was followed by a networking reception. 

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