• April 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    --1   2   3   4   5   52
    6   7   8   9   1011121
    131415161718192
    202122232425263
    27282930---4
    • 6th - Start of 2017-2018 tax year
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 14th - Easter Friday (E,W,NI,S)
    • 17th - Easter Monday (E,W,NI)
  • May 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    ----1   2   3   4
    4   5   6   7   8   9   105
    111213141516176
    181920212223247
    252627282930318
    • 1st - May Bank Holiday (E,W,NI,S)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 29th - Spring Bank Holiday (E,W,NI,S)
    • 31st - Employee P60s due
  • June 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   9
    8   9   101112131410
    1516171819202111
    2223242526272812
    2930-----13
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
  • July 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    --1   2   3   4   5   13
    6   7   8   9   10111214
    1314151617181915
    2021222324252616
    2728293031--17
    • 6th - Forms P11D, P11D(b) and P9D due
    • 6th - Form 42 Due
    • 12th - Battle of the Boyne - Bank Holiday (NI)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 19th - Payment of 2016/17 Class 1A NIC due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 31st - Payment of 2016/17 Class 2 NIC due
  • August 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    -----1   2   17
    3   4   5   6   7   8   9   18
    1011121314151619
    1718192021222320
    2425262728293021
    31------22
    • 7th - Summer Bank Holiday (S)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 28th - Summer Bank Holiday (E,W,NI)
  • September 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    -1   2   3   4   5   6   22
    7   8   9   1011121323
    1415161718192024
    2122232425262725
    282930----26
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
  • October 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    ---1   2   3   4   26
    5   6   7   8   9   101127
    1213141516171828
    1920212223242529
    262728293031-30
    • 5th - Personal Income Tax Statement
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 31st - Paper Self Assessment Tax Return Deadline
  • November 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    ------1   30
    2   3   4   5   6   7   8   31
    9   10111213141532
    1617181920212233
    2324252627282934
    30------35
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 30th - St. Andrew's Day (S)
  • December 2017

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    -1   2   3   4   5   6   35
    7   8   9   1011121336
    1415161718192037
    2122232425262738
    28293031---39
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 25th - Christmas Day
    • 26th - Boxing Day
  • January 2018

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    ----1   2   3   39
    4   5   6   7   8   9   1040
    1112131415161741
    1819202122232442
    2526272829303143
    • 1st - New Year's Day
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
    • 31st - Online Self Assessment Tax Return Due
  • February 2018

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   44
    8   9   101112131445
    1516171819202146
    2223242526272847
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
  • March 2018

    ThuFriSatSunMonTueWedTax week
    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   48
    8   9   101112131449
    1516171819202150
    2223242526272851
    293031----52
    • 17th - St. Patrick's Day (NI)
    • 19th - HMRC cheque payments due
    • 22nd - HMRC BACS payments due
UK Tax Week

   22 Jun - 28 Jun

21

 
 

Age of Progression

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Summary

As Sargent-Disc celebrates a quarter century of providing payroll services to the UK film industry, we undertake a statistical analysis, going back over the last three years, to look at the representation of the youngest and oldest across a range of production departments in the UK. We look at how the workforce is changing and where the best opportunities are for starting in the industry.

Tagged: Payroll, Production Accounting, Training, Statistics, Employee

UK Film Industry Age Analysis

Interact with the charts and data

 

Where to start?


We begin by looking at the youngest members of the workforce to see where the best opportunities are to start in the UK film industry and to discover the impact they have in terms of career progression. Over the three years of our sample, the three departments with the highest number of 16 - 20 year old employees are construction, props and the production office. Over half of 16-20 year olds start their careers in the construction and props departments.

 

  • 39% of 16 - 20 year olds work in construction, mainly as first, second and third year apprentices, and carpenters.
  • 13% of 16 - 20 year olds work in props, mainly as props trainees.
  • 10% of 16 - 20 year olds work in the production office, as production runners and assistants.


These departments have structured apprenticeship schemes or offer trainee positions particularly in technical and craft skills.

Age of ProgressionInteractive chart

 

To help visualise this information we have created an interactive chart for fifteen production departments.

Interact with the charts and data


Career progression

 

Between 2008 - 2011,the largest proportion of the 20 - 30 age group, over 22%, work in the production office with the majority still working as runners and assistants, but a wider range of roles are undertaken including; production secretary, assistant production co-ordinator, production co-ordinator, and producer's assistant. Those in the 20 - 30 age group are also finding work across a much wider range of departments and a variety of roles.

 

  • 12.4% of 20 - 30 year olds work in the art department, mainly as art department assistants, junior draughtsmen, and standby art directors.
  • 9.6% of 20 - 30 year olds work in the camera department, mainly as camera trainees, clapper loaders and 2nd assistant camera.
  • 9.6% of 20 - 30 year olds work in direction, mainly as runners, 3rd assistant directors and 2nd assistant directors.
  • 6.6% of 20 - 30 year olds work in costume, mainly as costume assistants, costume trainees and costume makers.


The construction and props departments appear to offer good long term employment prospects. Along with the transport department, they have the highest proportion of over 60s with a healthy 8% of the construction department in that age group.


59% of production office in 20 - 30 age group


By contrast, it is noticeable that after 30, far fewer people remain in the production office. In fact 59% of the production office is in the 20 - 30 age group and numbers then fall very quickly. It suggests that the production office is a good initial place to learn about production, before moving into other departments. Our analysis suggests a natural progression to the locations department where 50% of the department is 30 - 40 year olds, mainly working as location assistants and assistant location managers.


An aging workforce?


Today older generations expect to live and work longer than ever before. A recent Office of National Statistics report (1) showed that, because of a growing workforce, the number of people in work in the UK has increased, however, at the same time, unemployment has risen. This was found to be due in part to an ageing population, with 75% of jobs created in the year up to March 2011 going to the over 50s.


Looking at the UK film industry between 2008 and 2010, we also find a shift towards an older workforce. Between 2008 and 2009 the proportion of jobs going to the 40-50 age group increased by over 6%. Between 2009-10 the proportion of the workforce in the 50-60 age group increased by 23% and the share of jobs going to the over 60s age group went up by over 25%.


Our results also indicate that people are working longer, but do not answer the question whether this is out of choice or necessity? The only other age group to grow as a proportion of the workforce was the 16 to 20 age group, which may reflect an increased emphasis on vocational training and apprenticeships in the UK film industry.


Conclusion


So what are the best career prospects for young people? The youngest members of the workforce often enter the industry in unskilled and manual roles, in construction, props and in the production office. It seems that construction and props offer more stability, a 'job for life', yet with returns that are amongst the lowest for the over 60s. The production office remains very attractive to young people, to 'learn the ropes', and although few older people tend to work here, the financial rewards are significant. What would you chose?


1 Office of National Statistics. (2011). Labour market statistics, March 2011 Retrieved 06 05, 2011, from www.statistics.gov.uk

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